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Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:16
Getting given some for favours we have done - sooooo whats it taste like - how do you cook it etc??????

Polo
7th December 2008, 23:17
Oooo i love pheasant, very nice in a casserole, with bacon and things... I'm sure I've posted the recipe before, but might not have been on here... let me look :D

Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:18
actually hoping that these are plucked etc!

thought that you usually roast it

Jemima Puddle-Duck
7th December 2008, 23:20
Is it a cock or a hen hun? I am sure you cook these differently depending on sex of bird as cock birds can be tough if cooked for too long.

Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:22
Is it a cock or a hen hun? I am sure you cook these differently depending on sex of bird as cock birds can be tough if cooked for too long.


no idea - not got them yet - the cock is the more brightly coloured arent they?

Polo
7th December 2008, 23:23
Can't find the recipe now... I'll have to ask my mum :rofl:

We normally do it in a casserole, with bacon and red wine...or we roast and serve with a thick gravy. I'll pop back tomorrow Giz, or give me a prod if I forget!

Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:24
nae worries - probs wont get them till next week - though nearly stopped up and picked up a fresh roadkill one today as well

Jemima Puddle-Duck
7th December 2008, 23:25
My Dad used to go shooting so we were brought up on pheasant, geese etc....I hope for your sake they are already hung and plucked as i remember our 'hanging' cupboard:nono:


This is from the cottage smallholder, he said the same about knowing the sex.

Pot roast pheasant (gypsy style) for two
Ingredients:

1 hen pheasant (if you only have an old cock it’s worth marinating the bird in olive oil, lemon juice and white wine overnight)
2 slices of white doughy bread to line the base of the casserole (crusts removed)
1 bramley cooking apple or two eating apples and � a lemon
6 slices of streaky bacon
1 large glass of white wine (150ml)
3-4 of sprigs of thyme (9-12 seperate twigs)
1 slug of brandy
Parsley to garnishMethod:
Pre heat oven to 160c (140c fan)
Ideally you have an oval casserole and aluminium foil

Layer the base of the casserole with the slices of bread.
If using a cooking apple: Quarter the apple and remove the core (no need to peel the apple). Put half the apple, quartered again into the cavity of the pheasant. Chop the remaining half and scatter over the bread.
If using eating apples: Chop one apple and press it into the cavity. Chop the other apple and scatter over the bread base.
Chop three of the streaky bacon slices and scatter over the bread.
If using eating apples: squeeze the lemon juice over the pheasant and rub in. Halve the squeezed lemon and place in the cavity of the bird.
remove the woody bits from the thyme and scatter the leaves and soft stems onto the layer of bread. Place the three remaining slices of bacon over the breast of the bird and carefully place it breast down on the layer of bread.
Pour the glass of wine over the bird.
Put a piece of foil under the casserole lid to make a tight seal. Place in the centre of the preheated oven for 1.5 hours. Check to see how tender the bird is, using a fork. Bake for a further 15-20 minutes if necessary until very tender.
Adjust the oven temperature 180c (160c fan) and turn the bird over, breast up. Return the casserole (without lid) to the oven to brown the bird for ten minutes.
When it’s cooked splash on a glug of cooking brandy and replace the lid.
Allow to stand in a warm place whilst you prepare your vegetables: mini roast potatoes (http://www.cottagesmallholder.com/?p=290), carrots and peas are ideal.
Remove the pheasant to a warm place and stir your sauce well before serving.Serve the bread, bacon and apple sauce on each plate with the pheasant, sprinkled with torn parsley leaves. We also serve the apple from inside the bird as an instant apple sauce.
Tips and tricks:

we now hang game for two-three days max. If it is clearly a geriatric bird we marinate the bird overnight before cooking. Juice of one lemon, 2 tablespoons of olive oil and one tablespoon of white wine. Put the bird and ingredients into a plastic bag. Squeeze out the air and pop into the fridge. No need to turn the bird in the marinade as all flesh marinades with this method.

VeryTrying
7th December 2008, 23:26
Because it's a game bird, pheasant has to be well rotted before being cooked. Ugh!

If you cook it with red wine, that sort of masks the rotten meat taste and smell, but it's something I prefer to avoid since I don't want to up-chuck whilst still at the dinner table.

Enjoy :D

.

suziq
7th December 2008, 23:27
the cock is the more brightly coloured arent they?

maybe in the northeast......:love:

hidetheplastic
7th December 2008, 23:28
There's a gorgeous recipe on bbc good food site that I made ages ago that involved roasting it in cider and apple brandy. I just used apple juice as I didn't fancy the brandy. I remember you were supposed to set it alight (I didn't) but it turned out nice.

I did roast potatoes, red cabbage and honey roast parsnips.

Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:29
why am I sniggering like a school girl?

YooHoo
7th December 2008, 23:33
My DH loves pheasant, its more tasty than chicken. I just roast them but not for very long as they easily overcook. Usually around 30-35 min.

Gizmos
7th December 2008, 23:35
well apparently there will be loads f I want it - saw at least 200 today so .... plenty of scope for recipes i guess

Addy
7th December 2008, 23:54
According to "tradition" you should hang them til the maggots drop out of them :eek-2: but we used to get given a brace now and then by an uncle who went shooting and mum didn't hang them at all. Just roasted them, they tasted fine. There's not a great deal of meat on them tho.

DebbieE
8th December 2008, 00:07
why am I sniggering like a school girl?

And me - u been doing 'favours' for a 'game bird' ;)

Tuckerpoo
8th December 2008, 00:09
Used to take my old dogs shooting. I always cooked my pheasants fresh and didn't hang them as I found the taste too strong. I just used to cook them as I would for chicken by weight. As to being a pheasant plucker, I never did. I was taught to turn the skin of the bird inside out and pull back off the bird with the feathers still on. The whole thing comes off really easily. Beware of shot though, they can break teeth:D

Jemima Puddle-Duck
8th December 2008, 00:18
Beware of shot though, they can break teeth:D


:laugh:

tiger
8th December 2008, 00:31
Recently I noticed the bin man lift the lid of my neighbour's bin and then walk away and leave it. He took our bin but not theirs. I went to close the bin because we get a lot of magpies that pull stuff out the bin if they can.
The bin was full of dead pheasants. They have a friend that goes shooting and gives them the birds. What a waste.

pookienoodle
8th December 2008, 11:47
Fresh Pheasant can be treated the same way as chicken.
Remove the legs and breast and saute as you would chicken and then follow your favourite chicken recipie.
It also cooks wonderfully in the slow cooker with a good couple of slugs of booze( cider is good) and whatever winter veg you have available.

jacijim
8th December 2008, 16:42
dad brought pheasant home when i was a child. he hung it for 2 weeks, the smell put me off. nothing like turkey. didnt like taste too sweet. yuk

sarahjane01
8th December 2008, 16:50
I cook some last month using a BBC recipe which was amazing. The birds were covered in butter, seasoned and then bacon and cooked in a casserole dish in the oven with some dry cider. On the hob I cooked a dry cider and cream fraiche gravy. Served with roast pots and veg. Yum, yum. Hope some kind soul gets us some more.:D Luckily my neighbour plucked and sorted them out. I lurve my neighbour.:love:

Beej
8th December 2008, 17:44
I've never eaten pheasant but this thread reminds me of a rhyme my Dad used to sing to us:

"I'm not a pheasant plucker
I'm a pheasant pluckers son
I'm only plucking pheasant
'til the pheasant plucker comes"

He used to make us chant it faster and faster until we tripped over the words and then would tell us off for swearing.:):)

colman
8th December 2008, 18:22
had pheasant when i went out for a girly night on friday have had it before though...it was lovely...when i first had pheasant a few years ago i didn't realise it was white meat i imagined it red for some reason..

baffled
8th December 2008, 22:35
Getting given some for favours we have done - sooooo whats it taste like - how do you cook it etc??????

Pot roast pheasant, seasonal vegetables, savoy cabbage & a chocolate infused burgundy jus, by Andre Garrett,
head chef of Galvin at Windows, 28th Floor, London Hilton, Park Lane W1.

Prep time: 30 mins Cooking time: 1hr Serves: 4

Ingredients

1 large Pheasant
4 medium carrots
4 medium parsnips
2 small onions
2 cloves garlic
4 large slices streaky bacon
1 large Savoy cabbage
1/2 bottle burgundy red wine
200 ml cabernet sauvignon vinegar, or good red wine vinegar
250g unsalted butter
100g 75% cocoa solids dark chocolate, ideally (I’ve used Barry Callebaut)
Salt & pepper
1 litre poultry stock
3 tbsp vegetable oil

Get your butcher to clean the Pheasant, take off the legs & save for another job, soup or something, they are very sinewy. Cut out the wish bone making sure that there is good skin covering to help keep moist, take the bacon & lay over the breast bone & down the sides. Tie the bird with string, making sure the bacon in secure.
Peel the carrots & parsnips & cut into large finger size pieces, peel the onion & cut into quarters & peel the garlic cut in half & take out the green piece which gives the bad breath & smell (good tip).
Take a large pan with a tight fitting lid, heat on the stove, with a little oil. Cook the carrots & parsnips until a little golden, add the onions & garlic & colour a little. Season the Pheasant with salt & pepper making sure you get some into the cavity, take the vegetables out of the pan. Place the Pheasant into the pan, colour well on all sides. Return the vegetables to the pan. Add a little (10ml) poultry stock to keep moist. Put the lid on, turn down the heat to very low, keep checking the pan every 5 mins, turning the pheasant every 10 mins, ensuring that there is enough moisture so as not to burn the pan. The skin should develop a nice colour.
Cut the cabbage into thin slices discarding the stalks. Heat a little water & a good knob of butter in a pan large enough to hold the cabbage. Put in the cabbage & season with salt & pepper. Put on lid, turn down the heat & stir every 1-2 mins. The cabbage takes 6-8 mins to cook.
After about 45 mins the Pheasant should be cooked. To check pierce the breast with a fork & if the juices run clear it is ready. Leave to rest in a warm place. Take out the carrots & parsnips & keep warm.
Turn up the heat on the pan, pour in the wine, reduce until syrupy & then add a splash of vinegar. Reduce this a little before adding the rest of the poultry stock. Reduce until it coats the back of a spoon then pass through a fine mesh sieve twice into a clean pan. Check the sauce for seasoning, & then bring to just below the boil, before adding a little piece of butter to enrich the sauce. Break up the chocolate, add & whisk until melted. It’s very important not to boil it, as the chocolate will spoil. If you have some muslin to hand, pass the sauce through it, so it’s very fine & clean
The sauce should have a nice glossy shine & should coat the back of a spoon. Check for seasoning & balance with vinegar if needed.
Cut the string from the Pheasant, remove the bacon & cut the 2 breasts from the bird & strip off the remainder of the meat. Spoon a little cabbage on to heated plates, place the breasts & meat on to the cabbage & arrange the carrots & parsnips. Spoon a little sauce around the dish & serve the remainder in a jug on the side.
Top Tips

Take out the green piece in the centre of the garlic, which produces the bad breath & smell.
At this time of year, hang your pheasants for 2-3 days, or even better buy them from your butcher after they have hung, plucked & dressed.
It’s very important not to boil the chocolate, as it will spoil.Phew!
Crikey!
and
Lordy!


Slow cooker for me [imo].

Best,

B..

[If it turns out tough ... liquidise it for a 'Perfect Game Soup'.

Aardvaak
11th December 2008, 22:41
Getting given some for favours we have done - sooooo whats it taste like - how do you cook it etc??????

I usually cut them in quarters put a chicken tonight sause with them in a casserole dish and cook for 2.5 hours same as I do for chicken.

Most of my pheasants I have are normally roadkill.

Aardvaak
11th December 2008, 22:43
actually hoping that these are plucked etc!

thought that you usually roast it

I do have a plucking machine which you are welcome to use but I suspect you are not near me.

Aardvaak
11th December 2008, 22:47
Pot roast pheasant, seasonal vegetables, savoy cabbage & a chocolate infused burgundy jus, by Andre Garrett,
head chef of Galvin at Windows, 28th Floor, London Hilton, Park Lane W1.

Prep time: 30 mins Cooking time: 1hr Serves: 4

Ingredients

1 large Pheasant
4 medium carrots
4 medium parsnips
2 small onions
2 cloves garlic
4 large slices streaky bacon
1 large Savoy cabbage
1/2 bottle burgundy red wine
200 ml cabernet sauvignon vinegar, or good red wine vinegar
250g unsalted butter
100g 75% cocoa solids dark chocolate, ideally (Iíve used Barry Callebaut)
Salt & pepper
1 litre poultry stock
3 tbsp vegetable oil

Get your butcher to clean the Pheasant, take off the legs & save for another job, soup or something, they are very sinewy. Cut out the wish bone making sure that there is good skin covering to help keep moist, take the bacon & lay over the breast bone & down the sides. Tie the bird with string, making sure the bacon in secure.
Peel the carrots & parsnips & cut into large finger size pieces, peel the onion & cut into quarters & peel the garlic cut in half & take out the green piece which gives the bad breath & smell (good tip).
Take a large pan with a tight fitting lid, heat on the stove, with a little oil. Cook the carrots & parsnips until a little golden, add the onions & garlic & colour a little. Season the Pheasant with salt & pepper making sure you get some into the cavity, take the vegetables out of the pan. Place the Pheasant into the pan, colour well on all sides. Return the vegetables to the pan. Add a little (10ml) poultry stock to keep moist. Put the lid on, turn down the heat to very low, keep checking the pan every 5 mins, turning the pheasant every 10 mins, ensuring that there is enough moisture so as not to burn the pan. The skin should develop a nice colour.
Cut the cabbage into thin slices discarding the stalks. Heat a little water & a good knob of butter in a pan large enough to hold the cabbage. Put in the cabbage & season with salt & pepper. Put on lid, turn down the heat & stir every 1-2 mins. The cabbage takes 6-8 mins to cook.
After about 45 mins the Pheasant should be cooked. To check pierce the breast with a fork & if the juices run clear it is ready. Leave to rest in a warm place. Take out the carrots & parsnips & keep warm.
Turn up the heat on the pan, pour in the wine, reduce until syrupy & then add a splash of vinegar. Reduce this a little before adding the rest of the poultry stock. Reduce until it coats the back of a spoon then pass through a fine mesh sieve twice into a clean pan. Check the sauce for seasoning, & then bring to just below the boil, before adding a little piece of butter to enrich the sauce. Break up the chocolate, add & whisk until melted. Itís very important not to boil it, as the chocolate will spoil. If you have some muslin to hand, pass the sauce through it, so itís very fine & clean
The sauce should have a nice glossy shine & should coat the back of a spoon. Check for seasoning & balance with vinegar if needed.
Cut the string from the Pheasant, remove the bacon & cut the 2 breasts from the bird & strip off the remainder of the meat. Spoon a little cabbage on to heated plates, place the breasts & meat on to the cabbage & arrange the carrots & parsnips. Spoon a little sauce around the dish & serve the remainder in a jug on the side.
Top Tips

Take out the green piece in the centre of the garlic, which produces the bad breath & smell.
At this time of year, hang your pheasants for 2-3 days, or even better buy them from your butcher after they have hung, plucked & dressed.
Itís very important not to boil the chocolate, as it will spoil.Phew!
Crikey!
and
Lordy!


Slow cooker for me [imo].

Best,

B..

[If it turns out tough ... liquidise it for a 'Perfect Game Soup'.

The feet should be removed using a sinpull device that removes sinews.

baffled
11th December 2008, 23:03
The feet should be removed using a sinpull device that removes sinews.


Must say,

"Pot roast pheasant, seasonal vegetables, savoy cabbage & a chocolate infused burgundy jus, by Andre Garrett,
head chef of Galvin at Windows, 28th Floor, London Hilton, Park Lane W1.".


(Personally; Couldn't be bovvered faffing about with that)!

Standing-by my slo-cook and casserole reccy.!


Note,
(Whilst the bird may look magnificent, it may be a 'pensioner').

Look @ the 'spurs' to guage its age.... [length of the rear facing claw].

Best,

B..

nettie_b
11th December 2008, 23:14
i spent hours the other evening looking at recipies for pheasant, thought the cottage smallholder site was brill.

however am still undecided, pheasant - dependant on sex serves 1 or 3 (not talking about ppl here)

am still looking at wood pigeons thou.

TIGER: if u get to ur neighbour b4 i do pls explain that times are hard and bins full of edibles is complete waste!!! due to rats i've stopped my compost bin but i still throw it all down the valley - if appropriate. chop chicken fat up for birds, any roasted meets i chuck top of valley at nite for foxes and fruit or veg we may throw away i chuck down for the animals of farthing wood!

But I see we have a brilliant local butcher who supplies fresh local meet at not a bad price - Merricks in Glossop; i may try this year i do fancy slow cooking pheasant and having wood pigeon for starters!!

baffled
11th December 2008, 23:27
Nettie,
Hi,

Very little meat [breast only] on pidgeons.

But the carcass will give U a grand soup stock.

Ensure U are getting a young bird.

Best,

Baff..

nettie_b
11th December 2008, 23:36
Nettie,
Hi,

Very little meat [breast only] on pidgeons.

But the carcass will give U a grand soup stock.

Ensure U are getting a young bird.

Best,

Baff..

thanks, i was thinking one bird per person or one per 2 for starters - never tried it but from what i can gather you cook rather like a medium steak. at my local they are £2.80 each.

but i think i'd do either or ie: pigeon for starters or pheasant for main?

my bro and his new partner coming up next weekend 20th and mum home from spain so probs only time we can ALL be together - so would like to cook something different for a change.

more advice is always welcome. :D

baffled
12th December 2008, 00:00
Nettie,

imho .................... :gbxtank:

If [as you remark] 'tis for a 'special' rather than a regular 'day to day' family dish ....... get a bird in advance and have a trial run on yr. recipe.

And [personal opinion] pigeon as an 'entre' ....... nice choice!!


Best,

Baff..

nettie_b
12th December 2008, 01:39
Nettie,

imho .................... :gbxtank:

If [as you remark] 'tis for a 'special' rather than a regular 'day to day' family dish ....... get a bird in advance and have a trial run on yr. recipe.

And [personal opinion] pigeon as an 'entre' ....... nice choice!!


Best,

Baff..

cheers Baffled - great advice - i think i'll nip into glossop this week and get a pigeon to cook and try first as an entre!! with some refreshing salad or maybe a warm salad (bearing in mind my mum will have travel from Spain and bro and his spanish parter from london.

could stick to the devil i know for main - ie: pot capon or turkey but they may not fancy a large evening meal after travelling all day!

..........deal is sealed am off to the excellent organic butchers 2moz xxxx

chelseatom
12th December 2008, 02:07
if someone gave me a pigeon to eat, them i am afraid they would have to smell my cheese on the end of my fist

nettie_b
12th December 2008, 09:16
if someone gave me a pigeon to eat, them i am afraid they would have to smell my cheese on the end of my fist

well if it was served up it would represent a steak medallion and you wouldnt know otherwise. but at least it's not been mass produced in a factory!

navara
12th December 2008, 09:20
actually hoping that these are plucked etc!

thought that you usually roast it

Take it to SK:N:D

baffled
14th December 2008, 23:12
Missing person.


NettieB.


Went to Glossop for a pigeon.


All gone quiet!


.......................


Surely not fowl play?!





:) B..

SimonJB
14th December 2008, 23:15
Sure she's OK, don't get in a flap

baffled
14th December 2008, 23:17
I don't ordinarily stick me beak in.

SimonJB
14th December 2008, 23:23
Better to show concern for others than feather ones own nest

baffled
14th December 2008, 23:29
Better to show concern for others than feather ones own nest


Indeed.

B..

Tuckerpoo
14th December 2008, 23:57
Maybe she went by pigeon post?

devon1972
15th December 2008, 08:43
i heard that u need a well hung large cock ??? !!

devon1972
15th December 2008, 08:43
.....!

Deedee
15th December 2008, 09:05
smell my cheese on the end of my fist

pmsl havent heard that for ages!


re missing poster:

perhaps she has 2 in her bush!

navara
15th December 2008, 09:10
i heard that u need a well hung large cock ??? !!

Good job I popped on this morning;)

nettie_b
15th December 2008, 09:39
Well I have to say I didnt think I'd have my feathers ruffled this early on a Monday morning!! But you gave me a giggle which is rare - it being Monday n all that!

Back to the Bird! I ran the suggestion by my brother and all his replies were fowl! So I thought Stuff You! I literally aint got a pot roast to persist in why am i doing this - as well as buying a table off Ebay?? And worrying that whatever I cook wont be up to his southern standards!!

He disses us as northerners so am gonna behave like one - they can order a takeaway and eat on their knee - i'm stressed out enough!!! :D

shoppaholic45
15th December 2008, 10:57
They both sound yucky, its not something i could ever eat

pookienoodle
15th December 2008, 16:32
They both sound yucky, its not something i could ever eat

are you vegetarian then?

mutley muppet
15th December 2008, 21:10
They both sound yucky, its not something i could ever eat

I could never eat any birds as I am too soft. :rolleyes: I feed the wild birds every day, including wood pidgeons and even a family of 3 crows who beg at my back door every morning, lol! (i'm not joking!)

I don't eat any meat, but if you eat meat then I guess it is better to eat pheasant or birds who have had life in the wild rather than a chicken who has been stuck in a battery farm with no space or sunlight? :confused:

MM x

flufff
15th December 2008, 22:02
Sorry but only pheasant I ever cooked I buried in back garden.It stunk the house out.I tried because my ex husband was a gamekeeper (there was me thinking I was Lady Chatterly).

They hang Pheasant for days to mature (rot) the meet.The stench is awful.Bear in mind they contain lead shot from errrrr being shot.The flesh is apparently strong and gamey in flavour.

Rather you than me.Traditionally I believe you should cook them as a brace male/female.

My daughter could never prounounce pheasant so used to tell us there were peasants in the garden :D

baffled
15th December 2008, 22:40
If it's not right to eat animals ............



















Why are they made of meat?

baffled
15th December 2008, 23:19
actually hoping that these are plucked etc!


Just bung it in yr. h/bag and fling it over the counter for 'The full wax' whilst yr. being personaly, eeeeeeeeeeeerm, 'attended to'?


:) B..

nettie_b
16th December 2008, 00:20
Just watching Kill it, Cook it, Eat it....

with the guest butcher being my local John Mettrick of Mettrick butches in Glossop!

btw MM
i was a veggie for about 6 years, ate meat for first time in Morocco when the woman of house chased it all morning and cooked it for dinner - how could i refuse - served wi eggs and home made bread!

i think i should start feeding my kids less meat - well less but more of a better quality in that less is more.