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Aardvaak
29th October 2009, 18:39
We have been running our oil tank down so that we can change the connection to our new oil tank which is full with oil and doesn't leak.

However can anyone please help as to what I should do as the tank has run out and the red cut out light keeps on on the boiler and therefore won't ignite?

points reaper
29th October 2009, 18:43
this happened to me and it was down to sucking up sludge from the bottom of the tank when it went to low hope this helps mine was a right pain and had to draw the oil through the cow valve thats usually outside next to where your boiler is situated

carebabe
29th October 2009, 21:41
you will probably have to replace the filter

Aardvaak
29th October 2009, 23:46
you will probably have to replace the filter

Where is the filter at the tank or the boiler?

Grace & Favour
30th October 2009, 00:06
Where is the filter at the tank or the boiler?
I think it depends on the individual design of your kit - - although I would suspect there is at least one filter - and almost certainly nearer the boiler than the tank

Dominic
30th October 2009, 00:27
The price of oil these days, and what with interest rates so low too....

carebabe
30th October 2009, 12:47
just checked with OH about what he did when we ran out of fuel. he had to clean a filter (located after tank outlet) and a second filter located near the oil supply pipe going into house. will depend on your own installation as more recent systems are a different type.

Aardvaak
30th October 2009, 17:16
The price of oil these days, and what with interest rates so low too.....

What are you on about?

BritBrat
30th October 2009, 18:15
Assuming you now have it connected to new tank you may have to beed the fuel through.

Should be a screw on filter and also on pump.

Do not keep trying it with no fuel or you may damage the pump.

Also do not try and start it more than about 3 or 4 times without a rest in between or you may get a build up of fuel in the boiler and an explosion.

If it is blocked filter/s buy new cartriges and replace.




How To Bleed An Oil Burner

There can be many reasons why you will need to bleed the air out of the lines from the oil tank to the oil burner. The most common reason why you will have to bleed an oil burner is because you either ran to low on oil, clogged the lines, or you ran completely out of oil and the burner pump has now sucked air causing the burner to not ignite because the air to fuel mixture is just all wrong.

This method of bleeding lines on an oil burner will work for most units including Beckett, Carin and Riello burners. This method is also good for oil fired water heaters, as well as oil fired boilers and furnaces. When you bleed an oil burner you are removing the air from the lines. The oil lines run from the bottom of the oil tank to the burner. So keep that in mid when you are bleeding the lines. It really does not matter what is oil fired, you just need to make sure you get all of the air out.

You will need an adjustable crescent wrench or pair of pliers to loosen the oil bleed screw on the pump. Most Beckett oil burners will come with a Suntec oil feed pump. Some other brands like Reillo and Carlin have different oil feed pumps. You will see the bleed screw towards the front of the pump. Take your pair of pliers or crescent wrench and loosen the bleed screw so that its completely loose.

Once you have the bleed screw loose, re tighten it to just hand tight. What you will want to do now is to hit the reset button on the motor so that the motor will turn the pump and create a suction in the oil line. Once the motor starts on the oil burner wait about 2 seconds and then loosen the bleed screw about a half a turn and you will see that a gush of air should spit out followed by a nice stream of fuel oil.

If you open the bleed screw and the motor turns of before you get all the air out of the lines you will need to hit the reset button again and repeat the same process until you have a solid stream of fuel. If you hit the motor reset again and the motor does not turn on or you get a “locked out” message you will have to override the lock out command by holding down the reset button for ten seconds and then depressing it to only press it again to get the motor restarted. That safety lock out short cut will only work with older and only certain newer oil burners because most of the newer models have timed lock outs that can not be overridden because of safety reasons.

Once you have completely removed all of the air out of the lines your oil burner should start right up after you hit the rest bottom for the last time.



Takes me back as I used to service these.

Aardvaak
30th October 2009, 18:51
[QUOTE=BritBrat;1060284]Assuming you now have it connected to new tank you may have to beed the fuel through.

Should be a screw on filter and also on pump.

Do not keep trying it with no fuel or you may damage the pump.

Also do not try and start it more than about 3 or 4 times without a rest in between or you may get a build up of fuel in the boiler and an explosion.

If it is blocked filter/s buy new cartriges and replace.


Thank you very much for your reply, I have had a look at tank end and boiler end and there is no filters.

The new tank is connected with 2000 litres in it.

The boiler is a Camray 3 - I have attached a link to a photo I took of the pump on the boiler - perhaps you could take a look and tell me which is the bleed screw:-

http://i708.photobucket.com/albums/ww88/AardvaakPhotobucket/Camray3Boiler.jpg

BritBrat
30th October 2009, 20:07
That screw on the left DO NOT CHANGE as that I suspect is the pressure adjuster.

See if there is a screew on the other far side, if not just start as close to tank as possible cracking unions and let the fuel escape, lock it back up and move to next one untill you are at the burner.

Then when you have oil at the pump try and start the boiler again, but you may need to clean out filters as you could have drained a load of dirt into the line.

NO FILTER?

I would fit one, maybe a good idea to get an enginner out to service boiler and do it for you.

There may be a filter in the pump.
http://heating.danfoss.com/PCMPDF/DKBDPD010D502.pdf

Not saying that is your pump but just an example.

Memory is returning, :) there will be one in the nozzle, you have to remove it from boiler and unscrew the nozzel and there will be a filter you can unscrew, DO NOT UNSCREW the screw under the filter as you will break the seal and may have to fit a new nozzle, having said that I have done many times in the past.

If it was me I would have a filter fitted in the line so that the internal pump filters are protected as to clean an external line filter is easy and they also trap any small amounts of water that may come through.

Aardvaak
30th October 2009, 20:24
That screew on the left DO NOT CHANGE as that I suspect is the pressure adjuster.

See if there is a scree on the other far side, if not just start as close to tank as possible cracking unions and let the fule escape, lock it back up and move to next one untill you are at the burner.

Then when you have oil at the pump try and start the boiler again, but you may need to clean out filters as you could have drained a load of dirt into the line.

NO FILTER?

I would fit one, maybe a good idea to get an enginner out to service boiler and do it for you.

Thank you for your reply I'll have a look for that bleed scew - I can not see any filters anywhere.

Dominic
30th October 2009, 21:11
What are you on about?

Referring to a much earlier thread.... having a giggle at your expense.... apologies!

SimonJB
30th October 2009, 23:23
Referring to a much earlier thread.... having a giggle at your expense.... apologies!

I think I remember the thread you're referring to ;)