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Thread: Chat Thread 2012...

  1. #21
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    See I work from 8.30 till 1pm and my dogs (and Oscar) are happily left behind for upto 4.5 hours.. So half days sounds perfect Giz! I think if you were thinking of a puppy, my advice would be to crate train it and it wouldn't destroy your house. Lucy who is 10 months goes to sleep in hers and eats in hers and when I go out for longer periods she is in there too! However saying that I have let her in the house on the odd occassion with no regrets or mis-haps. I like to take dogs on later on in puppy hood as they tend to be toilet trained lol..
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  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Floosy View Post
    See I work from 8.30 till 1pm and my dogs (and Oscar) are happily left behind for upto 4.5 hours.. So half days sounds perfect Giz! I think if you were thinking of a puppy, my advice would be to crate train it and it wouldn't destroy your house. Lucy who is 10 months goes to sleep in hers and eats in hers and when I go out for longer periods she is in there too! However saying that I have let her in the house on the odd occassion with no regrets or mis-haps. I like to take dogs on later on in puppy hood as they tend to be toilet trained lol..
    Mark trained both of his Dobermans were they were pups like that and also got them used to being cages / belted in the cars

    Half days will be good and keeping fingers firmly crossed for that although it would be flexible and not always morning / afternoons a mix probs
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  3. #23
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    Sounds perfect! Do you have a particular breed that you like Giz?
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  4. #24
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    My Boxer pup playing tug with Oscar the foster!
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  5. #25

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    Crates have their uses, they are great "dens" for nervous dogs to choose to go into, good for transporting dogs safely and also really handy to confine dogs with serious injuries, but no way would I leave a puppy in one for 4 hours!

    Puppy's need to go to the toilet regularly and keeping a puppy locked in a cage for hours on end means that it is often forced to go to the toilet and it cannot get away from it. Dogs are naturally clean animals and they do not like to sleep in their own mess.

    Much better to create a safe area in your house where the pup can have a bed, toys and a seperate toileting areas (newspaper or puppy pads). It is easy enough to create a safe area by using baby gates. Most people find the kitchen a good area or you could baby gate off an entrance hall or utility room.

    If you are worried about a pup chewing kitchen cupboards or chair/table legs then a good "stop chewing spray" such as Grannicks will stop your pup chewing any valuables.

    You will need to address the problem of chewing & toilet training at some point and the younger it is done the better.

    This post is not directed at anyone here, but the rescue I volunteer for is seeing an increasing number of dogs being handed in that have spent years confined to crates for extended periods.
    Often these dogs are still not house trained and they are also often anxious and have problems interacting with other animals due to lack of socialisation.
    Other dogs develop the nasty habit of consuming their own faeces because they have been forced to toilet in their crate after being left in a crate too long.

    For more information please read this article by animal behaviourist Gwen Bailey: http://www.dogbehaviour.com/articles/dogs/cages.htm

    She has also written a book on puppy training called the "Perfect Puppy":http://www.dogbehaviour.com/books/perfect.htm which I would highly recommend to anyone thinking of taking on a pup.
    Please adopt a rescued dog or cat from your local animal shelter!

  6. #26

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    Floosy - the only dogs Ive had a soft spot for really are Border Collies

    we have a large walkin cupboard (6ft x 3ft low ceiling) under the stairs as a possible retreat area then letting it have the roam of the kitchen / family room and entrance hall (about 30m square in total) - its also all tile as well so easier to keep clean and no furniture apart form my decrepid table and old sofa!
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  7. #27

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    I'm another dog owner that's had success with crates. It was something I was a bit unsure of but decided to try it. With both dogs I had a crate that was bigger than they'd need when fully grown. Their bedding was on one side and then newspaper on the other, this meant that if they needed a wee they didn't need to do soil their beds. The first dog was about 10 months old when she was upgraded from the crate to a lobby area, a bit older and she got the kitchen, a bit older when she also got the dining room and then it wasn't much longer before she got free run downstairs. The second dog was out of her crate downstairs before she was 10 months old but slept in DD2's bedroom and was in the crate until she was about 1. Now she sleeps on DD2's bed.

    With both dogs I found that if we had lots of people in the house they went to their crates for peace and quiet and to get away from it all.

  8. #28
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    There are 3 dogs in this house Mutley and the reason Lucy was crate trained was for her own safety, she was the runt of the litter and a scrap of a puppy and personally I did not want her mullered/squashed by my german shepherd. I have areas in the house for all 3 dogs (as my house is opened planned) Hallway for Foster dog, lounge/kitchen for german shepherd and the crate for my female boxer - Which incidently is oversized for her and as dogs have a natural denning intinct I don't see the problem and at all other times she is either out walking in the garden or monging on the sofa. I really do admire your advice and would always seek an opinion as you are so knowlegable but Im sorry to create a post as you have done I do find it offensive. My dogs are ridiculously well cared for, fed the best of a raw diet loved and exercised.
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  9. #29
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    By the way she is toilet trained and has been since the age of 16 weeks (don't miss the days of taking her out every hour on the hour, when she wakes, when she eats and when she stops playing!) and when I have left her to her own devices hasn't chewed anything, perhaps because she is a lazy cow and likes to spend the duration sleeping on my sofa! And as for being worried about chewing anything I have gone passed that as my German Shepherd rather nicely chewed holes in my hallway wall lol.
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  10. #30

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    Floosy, I know you love your dogs dearly so please do not be offended by my post. I did say "This post is not directed at anyone here."

    I am only stating my experience, of course a giant oversized crate is different to putting a dog in a crate not much bigger that it's body. Sadly we have had cases where people buy a crate for a pup thinking it is big, but then not thinking ahead that the pup will grow. Big crates are expensive and some people scrimp on the cost.

    My neighbours poor little staffie was kept almost constantly in a crate for the first two years of her life before she adopted her and another rottie rescued locally had been stuck in a crate for years and she is a big dog. It's heart breaking.

    So if you are going to recommend a crate I would always stress that it needs to be oversized as sadly some people jsut don't think.
    Please adopt a rescued dog or cat from your local animal shelter!

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