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Thread: Bees in decline

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    Default Bees in decline

    Disease and loss of habit has resulted in a decline in the number of bees over the last few years. You might think that's good because you are afraid of being stung by bees, but think again. It's actually not that common to be stung by a bee unless you do something to agitate it.
    If a bee flies near to you don't panic and swat at it. Duck your head and walk away. You've probably just walked into it's flight path.
    If a bee gets into your house, please don't kill it. The very large bumble bees that you see in Spring and early Summer are queens. One queen builds a nest, lays eggs and rears the young and gathers food until the young bees are able to forage and then she stays in the nest. If you kill a queen bumble bee you've wiped out a whole colony.
    The majority of crops are dependant on pollination by bees so we need to do what we can to stop the decline.
    I've noticed in my own garden that we don't have as many varieties of bumble bees that we used to.
    My husband was a beekeeper and got me interested as well. I had to give up helping him as I found that I was reacting badly to bee stings. I didn't suffer from toxic shock, but I swelled up really badly and felt quite ill. I needed steroids from the doctor to reduce the swelling.
    He continued to keep bees, but I stayed indoors if he was working with them and kept away from the hives at all other times. I worked in the rest of the garden and never got stung.
    Before he started keeping bees I'm ashamed to say that I used to use pesticides on my roses. When I stopped using them I found that I actually had less greenfly on the roses due to the increase in ladybirds.
    PLanting bee plants, including wild flowers could help as well.
    One tip, if you do ever get stung by a honey bee, be careful how you remove the sting. It has a sac of venom attached which will still be pumping. scrape the sting off with your thumbnail or the side of a knife in the opposite direction from the way it entered.

  2. #2

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    think I will replant lavendar - when we had it a few years ago it really attracted the bees
    Changes .... PTS is going through Changes ...

  3. #3
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    I've been watching the bees on a cotoneaster bush at the front of the house today. It was smothered with bumblebees. The blackbirds love the berries in the autumn so it helps them as well.

  4. #4
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    Sep 2006
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    Where's all the gnats, midges, smuts, moths and cockchafers gone too??

    This time of year the car lamps, bonnet and screen should be 'caked' wiv um!

    B..

  5. #5
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    You're right baffled, probably due to loss of habitat and climate change as well, but I really don't miss the gnats and midges eating me.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by baffled View Post
    Where's all the gnats, midges, smuts, moths and cockchafers gone too??

    This time of year the car lamps, bonnet and screen should be 'caked' wiv um!

    B..

    Just been out in the garden baffled and, I can assure you, midges and gnats are still around (scratch, scratch )

    We were actually discussing this evening how there weren't many bumble bees around this year but lots of honey bees. We do have lots of plants in the garden but not a huge amounts in flower yet. May try to buy a few (more!) plants to plug this gap in the season.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiger View Post
    You're right baffled, probably due to loss of habitat and climate change as well, but I really don't miss the gnats and midges eating me.
    Swallows, swifts, martins and others wing 9k miles to have enough food to feed a family.
    No flying food, no birds!
    No bats, either.

    B..

  8. #8
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    No, we used to get lots of all those birds and bats, but rarely see them now. I hadn't realised until you mentioned it, but there are less midges around here this year.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by penfold View Post
    Just been out in the garden baffled and, I can assure you, midges and gnats are still around (scratch, scratch )

    We were actually discussing this evening how there weren't many bumble bees around this year but lots of honey bees. We do have lots of plants in the garden but not a huge amounts in flower yet. May try to buy a few (more!) plants to plug this gap in the season.
    Aye,

    But run yr. car down the lanes or motorway now......... not so long ago yr. lamps were 'black' after a few miles and serious 'bug-splat' on the screen.

    Not so now....

    B..

  10. #10
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    ahh i love bees i think they look very cute and soft (wouldn't want to find out though lol). i can rember watching a progam a few years ago about bee's in europe deing wiped out but hornits and thay they would eventually make their way to this country. they were particually vicious and could wipe out a hive of bees no problems. i hope they don't make it here like i said i love the bees and never kill one, not to keen on wasps i think they are more likely to sting and if my attempts to get one out of the house fail then it does get swatted.

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